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An endless number of figures buzz through the media about the economic developments predicted for the future. And indeed, the effects of the corona crisis on the global economy and the national economies operating there are serious. But what is now often quite slow in terms of supply and demand will soon pick up speed again. Anyone who neglects supply chain transparency in the expected catch-up effects after the end of the shutdown could face unpleasant surprises.

The corona virus and the mass quarantine, often referred to as shutdown or lockdown, imposed in almost all countries of the world to combat the pandemic have massively restricted economic activity in many regions. Due to the infection scenario, which spread with a geographical delay from China via Italy and Spain to the entire European domestic market and at the same time with great force also in the United States, many of the most important industrial nations and the trade routes connecting them were significantly affected. But however massively the influence of these restrictions was and still is felt in many countries, neither the basic framework conditions of modern economic activity nor the necessary infrastructure have been lost. Furthermore, the supply chains, which have clearly demonstrated their stability in supplying the population with food and medicines, medical protective equipment and hygiene products, have never been completely cut off. The know-how of the executing persons has not been lost either. The production of capital and consumer goods, which has recently been gradually restarted in almost all parts of the world, is therefore not starting from scratch.

However, there will of course be adjustments in supply chain management in the future. This applies in the short term to route changes due to the varying availability of different modes of transport and their respective transport capacities. In the long term, this concerns a new geographical positioning of the supply and production processes, which must be rethought and at the same time be designed to be less susceptible to disruptions. However, irrespective of this, digitisation and the supply chain visibility that can be achieved through its technological achievements will play an important role in ensuring that logistical processes can be implemented in the future in a more resource-saving and time-efficient manner.

Visibility of the transport processes as a decisive factor

In order to be able to react quickly to disturbances on the transport routes and to ensure an overview of the arrival and delivery of raw materials, semi-finished materials and finished products, the permanent flow of data in real time is essential. Synfioo provides its customers with individualized access to the information available in its databases. The clients can view these via the desired output device using easy-to-install and easy-to-use software. Visualizations such as those available in the tour management application OnTime Navigator provide precise information about when the next steps in a production or sales process can be taken after the recipient has received the respective goods. Conversely, the transporter knows when he can use his trucks for the next transport orders after the previous tour has been completed.

Digital innovations are indispensable

Certainly no one knows exactly how quickly and how comprehensively the economic recovery will progress in the national economies and the individual industries once this unprecedented interruption of customary courses of action has been overcome. But almost all experts agree that the achievements of the digital age – also and especially in logistics – will make a major contribution to quickly returning to pre-crisis levels and beyond. Supply Chain Visibility, as offered by Synfioo, will play a decisive role in this. It is therefore advisable to start looking now for promising solutions to increase efficiency in the supply chain so as not to lose the competitive advantage.